Test Post - May 21, 2019

On May 20, 2019, I heard Tom Walton's segment on our local public radio station discuss newspapers. Tom worked at the Toledo Blade for a long time.

During his May 20 podcast, Tom mentioned a one-page paper, called 'Hotsheet' that's printed by a banker in Le Mars, Iowa and distributed by hand to diners and coffee shops in the town.

Here's a Jan 29, 2019 siouxcityjournal.com story about Hotsheet.

... when you take a seat at any of a number of eating establishments in Le Mars for morning coffee or lunch, you're just as likely to see patrons getting information the old-fashioned way, by reading it off of a piece of paper instead of a small video screen.

For decades, the Hotsheet has been a staple here, providing local news headlines, sports scores and other tidbits of information. It can be found on tables at several fast food restaurants and cafes.

"It's kind of a throwback piece, but we still have a lot of people who like to pick it up and read it every day," said Brad Pick, the marketing officer at Primebank, which prints and distributes the one-page bulletin.

Printed on the front and back of each Hotsheet are a few local news headlines, local high school and national sports scores, the weather forecast, a joke of the day and Le Mars radio station KLEM's Citizen of the Day feature.

For decades, KLEM had put out the Hotsheet, and Primebank was an advertiser. Pick said that seven, eight, nine years ago, he's not exactly sure when, KLEM notified bank officers they were going to discontinue the Hotsheet.

every day, Monday through Friday, Pick gathers the news and other information off of KLEM's website, prints it out and delivers it to 14 or 15 spots in town by 10 a.m., in time for some of the late coffee groups to check it out.
It's an interesting story and idea. Hotsheet sounds like today's email newsletters.

Technically, the Hotsheet is a two-pager paper that's published on one piece of paper. Obviously, the content is printed on both sides of a sheet of paper.

I'm trying my hand at a web-version that would contain content that fits on both sides of an 8.5-inch by 11-inch sheet of paper. I'm basing the content on what I see in the Toledo Blade RSS feeds that I consume.

Since I rarely (never in recent years) have a need to print text on paper, I'm unsure of the acceptable font size. I searched for the desired font size for an office memo, and I found the following result:

Be sure that your memo is readable. As a general rule it is a good idea to use a Helvetica, Arial, or Times Roman font and a font size of 10-point or 12-point.

And for a resume:

The most common font to use is Times New Roman, in black and size 12 points.

Toledo Blade Summary - Tue, May 21, 2019

Local / Regional


Mercy Health, UAW officials back at bargaining table - Officials of the United Auto Workers and Mercy Health St. Vincent Medical Center went back to the bargaining table Monday in an attempt to resolve their two-week labor dispute. Negotiations took place at an undisclosed location and with the assistance of a federal mediator, according to spokesmen from both sides. The two sides began meeting at 1 p.m., but it was not known how long they continued to meet. Link

Toledo Zoo's new museum of natural history will feature many unique exhibits - It won't be just a new museum: Tropical plants, a prairie ... and the Venom room. Lizards, snakes, frogs, salamanders, fish, turtles, insects, crabs, birds, and other creatures will all become part of the new ProMedica Museum of Natural History opening May 31. Not to mention a large, two-story tropical greenhouse with more than 1,000 species of plants and a second greenhouse with a native prairie in bloom, both with animals living among the greenery. Link

Federal funds come in for pedestrian bridge in Marina District - About $280,000 in federal funds has been secured to cover much of the remaining costs of the $1.8 million pedestrian bridge Metroparks Toledo is having built over Main Street. The bridge will connect its future Glass City Metropark with the city of Toledo’s International Park on the east side of the Maumee River. Link

Ottawa Park Golf Course is open; city's two others remain closed - Toledo’s Ottawa Park Golf Course is open for play, but city crews still are working to get the other two municipal courses in good shape for the season. A combination of rainy weather and maintenance equipment in need of repairs delayed the opening of Ottawa Park, Detwiler, and Collins Park golf courses, which typically open in April. Crews were able to clean up Ottawa Park Golf Course enough so that it could open May 10, but the grass is still higher than is ideal for play. Link

Scott High School principal injured trying to break up fight - Four were students arrested after fight, which was triggered by social media post. Principal Carnel Smith was elbowed in the face, said Patty Mazur, spokesman for Toledo Public Schools. Mr. Smith did not seek medical treatment and worked the rest of the day, she said. The “large” fight broke out about 8:45 a.m. in the school hallway at 2400 Collingwood Blvd., with “parties in the fight” deploying Mace, Toledo police said in a report. Link

Former Bryan man allegedly tried to have social worker killed - A Florida man and former Bryan resident is accused of trying to hire a hitman to murder a child protective services social worker in Williams County for $1,000. David Culver, 35, of Fountain, Fla. — a registered sex offender convicted of endangering children — targeted a social worker who he believed was involved in an investigation that resulted in Culver’s separation from his children, according to federal investigators. Link

Toledo Walleye hit the road for Game 7, soon after Monday's 4 to 2 home loss. - Walleye brace for 'grumpy' 15-hour bus ride to Tulsa for the deciding Game 7 of the Western Conference finals. For the Walleye, stinging worse than the looming bus ride was their inability to finish off Tulsa in front of a longing home crowd. It was a Monday night party, the Huntington Center the place to be seen, although definitely not heard, the din approximating a chainsaw in a closet. Cowbells clanged. Towels waved. Lungs leathered. Another overflow audience rattled the building in anticipation of the Walleye's first Kelly Cup trip in their decade-long existence. Link

UT baseball coach Mee steps down after 16 seasons - The University of Toledo announced Monday that baseball coach Cory Mee has decided to step down to pursue other opportunities. Mee had served as the Rockets' coach since 2004. He compiled an overall record of 366-513-1, including a 195-215 mark in the Mid-American Conference. This past season, Toledo was 17-36 overall and 4-21 in the MAC. Link

Athletics hold off Indians 6-4 - Lindor homers for Cleveland, but Oakland wins fourth straight game. Athletics pitcher Brett Anderson (5-3) allowed one run in 5 1/3 innings, improving to 4-0 with a 0.94 ERA in six starts against the Indians. The 31-year-old left-hander was injured in the fifth inning when he ducked to avoid a ball hit up the middle by Roberto Pérez. Anderson also had to watch the bat, which broke when Pérez made contact. Link

Browns' coach, GM attend baptism of Kareem Hunt - Coach Freddie Kitchens on former UT running back: “We care about Kareem as a person. We went there for Kareem Hunt as the person and not the football player.” The Browns were criticized for signing Hunt to a one-year contract as a free agent in February after his release by the Kansas City Chiefs, who said the 23-year-old lied to them about his actions during an altercation with a woman in a Cleveland hotel hallway early last year. Link

National / International


Tech slide headline dip in market - The U.S. decision to ban technology sales to China’s Huawei hammered the tech sector, particularly chipmakers. About one-third of Huawei’s suppliers are American chipmakers and investors are worried that the action against Huawei could crimp sales for companies with revenue heavily tied to China. Apple also skidded after an analyst warned that the iPhone maker’s growth prospects could dim as the U.S. and China continue to spar over trade. The Huawei ban is adding more anxiety to a market worried about further escalations in the trade war between the U.S. and China. Link

Ford is cutting 7,000 white-collar jobs - The company has said it was undertaking a major restructuring, and said Monday it will have trimmed thousands of jobs by August. The company said that the plan will save about $600 million per year by eliminating bureaucracy and increasing the number of workers reporting to each manager. “To succeed in our competitive industry, and position Ford to win in a fast-charging future, we must reduce bureaucracy, empower managers, speed decision making and focus on the most valuable work, and cost cuts,” Hackett’s wrote. Link

U.S. prepares roll out of Middle East peace plan - The Trump Administration will unveil the first phase of its blueprint for peace in the Middle East peace next month at a conference in the region designed to highlight economic benefits that could be reaped if the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is resolved, the White House said Sunday. The plan, which has been two years in the making, envisions large-scale investment and infrastructure work in the Palestinian territories. The central political elements remain mostly unknown. Link

Iran steps up enrichment of uranium - Iran quadrupled its uranium-enrichment production capacity amid tensions with the United States over Tehran’s atomic program, nuclear officials said Monday, just after President Trump and Iran’s foreign minister traded threats and taunts on Twitter. Link

Mexico: U.S. should support regional development to curb immigration - A U.N. commission on Monday presented a roadmap to boost economic development in three Central American nations whose poverty and violence now pushes desperate migrants to travel across Mexico to the United States. The plan calls for hefty increases in social spending, tackling corruption and improving security — as well as a hefty dose of financial support and investment, possibly from the United States. Mexico’s foreign minister estimates plan would require $10 billion annually from United States over 10 years. Link

Joke of the day


Why didn't the skeleton cross the road?

He had no guts.




I edited the above text within a Google doc sheet. I changed the font size for the main text to 10. Font family Times New Roman. Font size of 14 for page title. Font size of 12 for the headings. I shrunk the top and bottom margins. I removed some text from a few stories to get the content to fit on two pages (one sheet of paper if printed on both sides).

This is the plain text output option from Google Docs.




Toledo Blade Summary - Tue, May 21, 2019

Local / Regional

Mercy Health, UAW officials back at bargaining table - Officials of the United Auto Workers and Mercy Health St. Vincent Medical Center went back to the bargaining table Monday in an attempt to resolve their two-week labor dispute. Negotiations took place at an undisclosed location and with the assistance of a federal mediator, according to spokesmen from both sides. The two sides began meeting at 1 p.m., but it was not known how long they continued to meet.

Toledo Zoo's new museum of natural history will feature many unique exhibits - It won't be just a new museum: Tropical plants, a prairie ... and the Venom room. Lizards, snakes, frogs, salamanders, fish, turtles, insects, crabs, birds, and other creatures will all become part of the new ProMedica Museum of Natural History opening May 31. Not to mention a large, two-story tropical greenhouse with more than 1,000 species of plants and a second greenhouse with a native prairie in bloom, both with animals living among the greenery.

Federal funds come in for pedestrian bridge in Marina District - About $280,000 in federal funds has been secured to cover much of the remaining costs of the $1.8 million pedestrian bridge Metroparks Toledo is having built over Main Street. The bridge will connect its future Glass City Metropark with the city of Toledo’s International Park on the east side of the Maumee River.

Ottawa Park Golf Course is open; city's two others remain closed - Toledo’s Ottawa Park Golf Course is open for play, but city crews still are working to get the other two municipal courses in good shape for the season. A combination of rainy weather and maintenance equipment in need of repairs delayed the opening of Ottawa Park, Detwiler, and Collins Park golf courses, which typically open in April. Crews were able to clean up Ottawa Park Golf Course enough so that it could open May 10, but the grass is still higher than is ideal.

Scott High School principal injured trying to break up fight - Four were students arrested after fight, which was triggered by social media post. Principal Carnel Smith was elbowed in the face, said Patty Mazur, spokesman for Toledo Public Schools. Mr. Smith did not seek medical treatment and worked the rest of the day, she said. The “large” fight broke out about 8:45 a.m. in the school hallway at 2400 Collingwood Blvd., with “parties in the fight” deploying Mace, Toledo police said in a report.

Former Bryan man allegedly tried to have social worker killed - A Florida man and former Bryan resident is accused of trying to hire a hitman to murder a child protective services social worker in Williams County for $1,000. David Culver, 35, of Fountain, Fla. — a registered sex offender convicted of endangering children — targeted a social worker who he believed was involved in an investigation that resulted in Culver’s separation from his children, according to federal investigators.

Toledo Walleye hit the road for Game 7, soon after Monday's 4 to 2 home loss - Walleye brace for 'grumpy' 15-hour bus ride to Tulsa for the deciding Game 7 of the Western Conference finals. For the Walleye, stinging worse than the looming bus ride was their inability to finish off Tulsa in front of a longing home crowd. It was a Monday night party, the Huntington Center the place to be seen, although definitely not heard, the din approximating a chainsaw in a closet. Cowbells clanged. Towels waved. Lungs leathered. Another overflow audience rattled the building in anticipation of the Walleye's first ever Kelly Cup trip.

UT baseball coach Mee steps down after 16 seasons - The University of Toledo announced Monday that baseball coach Cory Mee has decided to step down to pursue other opportunities. Mee had served as the Rockets' coach since 2004. He compiled an overall record of 366-513-1, including a 195-215 mark in the Mid-American Conference. This past season, Toledo was 17-36 overall and 4-21 in the MAC.

Athletics hold off Indians 6-4 - Lindor homers for Cleveland, but Oakland wins fourth straight game. Athletics pitcher Brett Anderson (5-3) allowed one run in 5 1/3 innings, improving to 4-0 with a 0.94 ERA in six starts against the Indians. The 31-year-old left-hander was injured in the fifth inning when he ducked to avoid a ball hit up the middle by Roberto Pérez.

Browns' coach, GM attend baptism of Kareem Hunt - Coach Freddie Kitchens on former UT running back: “We care about Kareem as a person. We went there for Kareem Hunt as the person and not the football player.” The Browns were criticized for signing Hunt to a one-year contract as a free agent in February after his release by the Kansas City Chiefs, who said the 23-year-old lied to them about his actions during an altercation with a woman in a Cleveland hotel hallway early last year.

National / International

Tech slide headline dip in market - The U.S. decision to ban technology sales to China’s Huawei hammered the tech sector, particularly chipmakers. About one-third of Huawei’s suppliers are American chipmakers and investors are worried that the action against Huawei could crimp sales for companies with revenue heavily tied to China. Apple also skidded after an analyst warned that the iPhone maker’s growth prospects could dim as the U.S. and China continue to spar over trade. The Huawei ban is adding more anxiety to a market worried about further escalations in the trade war between the U.S. and China.

Ford is cutting 7,000 white-collar jobs - The company has said it was undertaking a major restructuring, and said Monday it will have trimmed thousands of jobs by August. The company said that the plan will save about $600 million per year by eliminating bureaucracy and increasing the number of workers reporting to each manager.

U.S. prepares roll out of Middle East peace plan - The Trump Administration will unveil the first phase of its blueprint for peace in the Middle East peace next month at a conference in the region designed to highlight economic benefits that could be reaped if the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is resolved, the White House said Sunday. The plan, which has been two years in the making, envisions large-scale investment and infrastructure work in the Palestinian territories. The central political elements remain mostly unknown.

Iran steps up enrichment of uranium - Iran quadrupled its uranium-enrichment production capacity amid tensions with the United States over Tehran’s atomic program, nuclear officials said Monday, just after President Trump and Iran’s foreign minister traded threats and taunts on Twitter.

Mexico: U.S. should support regional development to curb immigration - A U.N. commission on Monday presented a roadmap to boost economic development in three Central American nations whose poverty and violence now pushes desperate migrants to travel across Mexico to the United States. The plan calls for hefty increases in social spending, tackling corruption and improving security. Mexico’s foreign minister estimates plan would require $10 billion annually from United States over 10 years.

Joke of the day

Why didn't the skeleton cross the road?

He had no guts.


Wrap-up

A Blade version of the Hotsheet could be an interesting idea. A human would have to create the content by culling content from the latest stories like I did above.

The Blade's daily summary could be a one sheet, two page publication. It could be distributed to local coffee shops and restaurants and maybe at some other high-traffic businesses.

Obviously, it's a time commitment to create, print, and distribute the paper. Start small initially, regarding the number of copies printed and the number of locations that receive copies.

In addition to a print version, the same content could be formatted to be a daily email newsletter that replaces the Blade's current email newsletter, which lists only a few stories, and it's too heavily formatted with HTML, which gets mangled some in my email account.

I despise heavy use of HTML in emails.

The email newsletter version would contain links for each block of content that point to the Blade's unfortunately bloated web design.

In addition to the print and email newsletter versions of the same content, an audio version should be created too as a podcast.

And maybe a web version would exist too.

  • print
  • email newsletter
  • web page
  • podcast
  • pdf file

Web version of the email newsletter:

https://buttondown.email/sawv/archive/toledo-blade-summary-tue-may-21-2019/

buttondown.email provides an RSS feed for the web versions of the email newsletters that I send.

https://buttondown.email/sawv/rss

I have only tested the service. I don't use it for real, but I like it. It's an easy to use service with a nice UI/UX.

Buttondown's email newsletter version looked excellent in my Fastmail account.

Web page version:

http://sawv.org/2019/05/21/toledo-blade-summary-tue-may-21-2019.html

My web version, however, is slightly larger than what I used to create the one-page version.

The Blade could host the web version on its own domain name, but if it didn't mind the email newsletter service hosting the web version, then that could suffice.

The podcast versions would include an RSS feed too, of course.

On my iPhone, I used iOS's speech feature to have the system read the web page version. The computer voice is okay, but if the Blade did this for real, humans would need to read it. The iOS speech feature read my web page version in 7 minutes. My own CMS app said the reading time for my web page version was 7 minutes.

PDF version:

http://sawv.org/tbsum21may2019.pdf

The PDF version would allow users to print their own copy, although they could print the web versions too, except that the web versions might print a little differently, taking more pages.

The Google Docs word processor web app offered several different ways to save the content, include epub, rtf, and odt formats

I think that print, email, web, and audio is enough.

I forgot to include the weather forecast in my final printable version. I added the forecast to my web version at the above link. But again, that page of content is too large for one sheet of paper. I would have had to edit out more text to make it fit on one printed sheet. Obviously, the email and web versions don't have such limits.

More stories could be included if the summary sizes for the stories were reduced. But if the summaries are too short, it's possible that the stories could be hard to understand.